Membrane Bioreactor for Golf Course Water Mining Project

Dynatec's DynaLift™ has proven to provide high quality water with non-detect levels of virus and bacteria, thus providing safe irrigation for reuse.

Installation

The Challenge:

The County-owned golf course in Pitman, NJ did not have enough water for irrigation. The facility used well water, and had to withdraw more water than their permit allowed in order to satisfy their irrigation requirements. The challenge therefore was to provide water of a quality that satisfied their requirements, but did not exceed their permitted volume.

The Evaluation:

The only local source of water available was a local sewer that passed close to the facility, but on the other side of major divided highway. After an evaluation, MBR treatment was selected to provide high quality water.

The Dynalift™ process was selected, since it proves to provide water with non-detect levels of virus and bacteria, therefore providing safe irrigation for the golf course.

The Process:

  • Wastewater is pumped from a sewer line several hundred yards from the treatment facility.
  • The water is screened to remove larger solids. The screenings are returned to the sewer line via gravity
  • The screened water is then pumped to the biological system.
  • Two biological trains consisting of anoxic and aerated zones are used to remove both organic constituents as well as ammonia from the waste, producing water with non-detect levels of BOD and low levels of total nitrogen.
  • The mixed liquor is then separated using two DynaLIft™ membrane racks.
  • The DynaLift™ system is an out-of-basin membrane system using 0.03 µm micron ultrafiltration membrane to separate the biomass from the water, producing water with non-detect levels of TSS.
  • The DynaLIft™ system is a low-energy system that uses air as a scouring medium to prevent fouling of the membrane.
  • Periodically, the membrane is backwashed – this is the only type of polymeric tubular membrane that is capable of being backwashed – to prevent membrane fouling.
  • The discharged water is stored in a lagoon until required by the golf course. The water is pumped through pipe that was installed by directional drilling under the highway, where distribution pumps are then used to irrigate the golf course.
  • Waste sludge is also returned to the sewer line automatically based on operator inputs. The facility is completely self-sufficient, with all waste products being discharged from the treatment building underground, and therefore causing no local smell nuisance to local residents.

Conclusion:

The plant operates completely automatically with only part-time supervision, and produces the highest quality water in quantities sufficient for the golf course’s requirements. The facility does not require any sludge treatment – a consistently odor-producing operation. All the air from the operation is directly vented outside the building, making the operating environment safe and pleasant for the operators. This fact also means that the environment inside the building is no more humid than the ambient atmosphere, resulting in a             non-corrosive atmosphere. Building costs therefore are kept modest, since no anti-corrosive measures are required in building design.

Typical performance is as follows:

Parameter

Influent, mg/L

Permeate mg/L

BOD

112

ND

TKN

46

 

N-Total

 

>2

TSS

120

ND

 

 

Document downloads

Golf Course Water Mining Project.pdf
Golf Course Water Mining Project.pdf
pdf (623.38kb)
DynaLift MBR.pdf
DynaLift MBR.pdf
pdf (919.18kb)
Containerized MBR.pdf
Containerized MBR.pdf
pdf (1,074.58kb)